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Anymore, Any more; Anyone, Any one; Everyone, Every one; Everybody, Every body

Some words written as one word will differ in meaning when split into two words. So you need to know which word you really want.

Anymore: any longer, nowadays
Example: Harry doesn’t travel anymore.

Any more: something additional or further
Example: I don’t want any more cake.


Anyone:
anybody
Example: Anyone can learn to cook but few can learn to cook well.

Any one: any single member of a group of people or things
Example: Can any one of you tell me the answer to my question?

 

Everyone: everybody
Example: Everyone on the list has contributed to the ASPCA.

Every one: each one
Example: I wish I could buy every one of those puppies.

 

Everybody: everyone
Example: Everybody is working harder today than ten years ago.

Every body: each body
Example: Every body requires protein, vitamins, and minerals.

 

Pop Quiz

1. I don’t want to talk about this anymore/any more.
2. I didn’t ask for anymore/any more work to be put on my desk.
3. Not everyone/every one has natural rhythm.
4. However, everyone/every one of us can learn to dance.
5. She doesn’t know anyone/any one in France.
6. He likes everybody/every body that he works with.
7. Anyone/Any one of you can redecorate the office if you would like.
8. Everybody/Every body is made up of bones, muscles, and flesh.

 

Pop Quiz Answers

1. I don’t want to talk about this anymore.
2. I didn’t ask for any more work to be put on my desk.
3. Not everyone has natural rhythm.
4. However, every one of us can learn to dance.
5. She doesn’t know anyone in France.
6. He likes everybody that he works with.
7. Any one of you can redecorate the office if you would like.
8. Every body is made up of bones, muscles, and flesh

Posted on Friday, October 26, 2007, at 10:18 pm


12 Comments

12 Responses to “Anymore, Any more; Anyone, Any one; Everyone, Every one; Everybody, Every body

  1. Michelle says:

    Thank you, thank you, thank you. I become so frustrated every time I use the phrase “any more” with my word processor, and it underlines it with green suggesting I remove the space! Though, it can get a little fuzzy when you are speaking of time as a unit (a noun, one more time, like one more piece of cake) rather than adverbally (when–anymore).

    • Jane says:

      Michelle, I’m glad that this was helpful. I think of the “any more cake” situation this way: I would say or write, “I want no more cake.” The expression “no more” is always two words. Therefore, if I say/write, “I don’t want any more cake,” I should also use the two-word form.

  2. Rino, says:

    I am fluent in three languages and pretty often I need to double check the grammar .This evening I ‘ve found a real rich website,I am going to stick to it for any further grammar quizzes!

  3. Idiots says:

    There is no such word as “anymore”, it is TWO words, and always has been. Just because a bunch of illiterate idiots now get to publish their ‘work’ on the internet every day, in the form of ‘text speak’ forum posts, doesn’t mean that the rest of us have to adopt their STUPIDITY.

    “Any more” is TWO words, NEVER one word.

  4. Mary says:

    I love this website, and I use it all the time as an editing reference; especially when I need to justify a change to a document (I’m a “freelance” editor/writer, meaning I don’t have a real job. Ha!) I have used this site for years, and I am grateful to Ms. Straus for providing such an excellent source of knowledge and information. As for the person who wrote that “Any more is TWO words, NEVER one word,” my suggestion is that you do a simple check before insisting you’re an expert (and proclaiming that everyone else in the world is ignorant – a sure sign of ignorance on the part of the speaker). Any dictionary would have proved you wrong BEFORE making a fool of yourself.

  5. Splog says:

    ‘Anymore’ is not a word in English, although it might be acceptable in American English. In English ‘any more’ as two separate words is correct.

    • Jane says:

      Any more and anymore are distinctly different and have different meanings in English.

      Any more means something additional or further.
      Example: I don’t want any more cake.

      Anymore means any longer.
      Example: Harry doesn’t travel anymore.

  6. Erika says:

    Splog said:
    [ ‘Anymore’ is not a word in English, although it might be acceptable in American English. In English ‘any more’ as two separate words is correct. ]

    Splog, thank you for your clarification. I found this site specifically because I was seeking to determine whether “any more” was an acceptable usage in UK/International English as a replacement where “anymore” would be absolutely required in American English as detailed in the article. The usage of “anymore” versus “any more” in certain situations is taught in school in the United States as correct in order to differentiate the ideas conveyed by the two usages. I’ve been asked to line-edit a UK-writer’s work and I don’t want to come off as poorly-educated and provincial by correcting something that doesn’t need to be corrected!

    I realize that those living in England feel that they speak the “real” English, and that technically those of us barbarians living elsewhere do, in fact, speak a dialect thereof–after all, the language is named after the country. However, if you ever happen back across this page and read this comment (or for anyone else who happens to be reading this comment and may make similar statements in the future), it would be helpful to clarify–even if only to assist Google or other search engines–that you mean something isn’t acceptable in UK or International English rather than just “English,” which can be confusing when only a snippet of the website content is returned in the search results. :)

  7. Jeanne says:

    what’s the difference between using someone and somebody?

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