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Some Confusing Words

We have many words in the English language that have subtle differences between them. If you know these differences, you will be confident that you are conveying the meaning you intend.

The five sets of confusing words we will cover today are:
Adverse vs. Averse
Uninterested vs. Disinterested
Suppose vs. Supposed
Oriented vs. Orientated
Democratic Party vs. Democrat Party

Adverse vs. Averse
Adverse = unfavorable or antagonistic in purpose or effect
Averse = strongly opposed or unwilling
Examples:
She had an adverse reaction to the medication.
They experienced adverse weather conditions.
He is averse to a military draft.

Uninterested vs. Disinterested
Uninterested = not interested
Disinterested = unbiased
Examples:
She seemed uninterested in history.
Because she was disinterested, she acted as the mediator.

Suppose vs. Supposed
Suppose = to assume to be real or true; to consider as a suggestion
Supposed = intended; required; firmly believed; permitted
Examples:
I suppose you will tell me when it’s time for dinner.
Suppose we go to the movie now…will that work for your schedule?
We were supposed to meet at the theater.
He is supposed to be at work at 6:00 P.M.

Oriented vs. Orientated
The dictionary allows you to use either word to mean “adjusted or located in relation to surroundings or circumstances.”
Examples:
The house had its large windows oriented toward the ocean view.
OR
The house had its large windows orientated toward the ocean view.

Democratic Party vs. Democrat Party
It’s the Democratic Party. Some non-Democrats don’t like the implication that one party has a lock on democratic principles so will say Democrat Party.

Posted on Monday, March 3, 2008, at 7:13 pm


2 Comments

2 Responses to “Some Confusing Words”

  1. Jarrod Kiraly says:

    This is actually a wonderful article – thank you so substantially for sharing!

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