Bad vs. Badly

Posted on Friday, July 6, 2007, at 2:50 pm

The word bad is an adjective used to modify nouns and pronouns. Example: She was in a bad accident. Adverbs often end in ly. The word badly is an adverb that answers how about the verb. Example: She was hurt badly in the accident. The confusion comes with four of┬áthe sense verbs: taste, look, smell, …

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Different From vs. Different Than

Posted on Friday, July 6, 2007, at 2:46 pm

Different from is the standard phrase. Most scholars obstinately avoid different than, especially in simple comparisons, such as You are different from me. However, some of the experts are more tolerant of different than, pointing out that the phrase has been in use for centuries, and has been written by numerous accomplished authors. These more-liberal …

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Whoever vs. Whomever

Posted on Sunday, May 27, 2007, at 9:41 pm

In the "English Rules" section of our website, GrammarBook.com, you will find our simple explanation for determining whether to use who or whom. Briefly, this is the trick: who = he (subject pronouns) whom = him (object pronouns) Example: Who/Whom is at the door? He is at the door. Example: For who/whom should I vote? …

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Fewer vs. Less

Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2007, at 12:46 am

Fewer refers to things that are countable. Examples: We had fewer people at the fundraiser than we had hoped. Fewer tornadoes occurred this year than last year. Generally, less refers to things that are not countable. Examples: Sue has less concern for her dog's safety now that the backyard fence is completed. Less talking would …

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