Good vs. Well

Posted on Friday, April 6, 2007, at 11:07 pm

Good is an adjective while well is an adverb answering the question how. Sometimes well also functions as an adjective pertaining to health. Examples: You did a good job. Good describes job, which is a noun, so good is an adjective. You did the job well. Well is an adverb describing how the job was …

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Adjectives and Adverbs: Forms for Comparison

Posted on Sunday, April 1, 2007, at 3:45 am

A common error in using adjectives and adverbs arises from using the wrong form for comparison. Incorrect: She is the poorest of the two women. Correct: She is poor. (positive form) She is the poorer of the two women. (comparative form) She is the poorest of them all. (superlative form) Many one- and two-syllable adjectives …

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You Could Look it Up

Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007, at 2:06 pm

I hope you enjoy this. Thanks to Peter H. for sending it. There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that word is up. It's easy to understand up, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, …

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What Does vs. What Do

Posted on Friday, March 2, 2007, at 3:10 pm

Should we say, "What does Gloria and I have in common?" or "What do Gloria and I have in common?" If you turn the question around to place the subjects first, you would say, "Gloria and I does/do have what in common." Gloria and I are the subjects so we need a plural verb. Which …

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Some vs. Any

Posted on Saturday, February 24, 2007, at 8:23 pm

Any and some can be synonymous; that is, they may have the same meaning. Both may be used in affirmative or negative questions: Examples: Will you have any? Will you have some? Won't you have any? Won't you have some? Generally, it is better to use some, not any, for affirmative statements and answers. Correct: …

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