Sign Up For Our Free Grammar E-Newsletter

Definite Ideas About Definite and Indefinite Articles

Take a look at this sentence from a restaurant review that was sent in by a reader:

The restaurant operates with an efficiency and authority that defy the chaos in the pleasant but cramped room.

Is it correct to use the indefinite article an in front of an abstract noun (efficiency)? If so, should we also use an in front of authority?

Although abstract nouns don’t always have to take articles, notice how the sentence above feels incomplete¬† if we leave the article out: The restaurant operates with efficiency and authority that defy the chaos in the pleasant but cramped room.

Revised: The restaurant operates with efficiency and authority, defying the chaos in the pleasant but cramped room.

If you wish to use articles in front of multiple abstract nouns, you need to check if the nouns are acting as a single unit or separately. In the sentence sent in by the reader, efficiency and authority could be seen as acting as a one-unit compound noun. Therefore, the sentence is fine as is.

When compound nouns are considered one unit, you may drop the second article.

Example from The Chicago Manual of Style: The horse and rider appear to be one entity.

Instead of: The horse and the rider appear to be one entity.

Note that one-article compound nouns (the horse and rider) still take plural verb forms (appear).

Example of nouns acting separately: She proceeded with a plan and a desire to make it better.

You can also have a compound noun containing an abstraction (no article) and an object (article required):

Example: Diligence and a needle fix many problems.

Posted on Thursday, February 5, 2009, at 10:13 am


2 Comments

2 Responses to “Definite Ideas About Definite and Indefinite Articles”

  1. Hari H. says:

    I am doubtful about the need for the articles – A/AN/The. Can you please elaborate on the same. It will be very helpful.

    • Jane says:

      Briefly, the words a, an, and the are called “articles.” A and an are called indefinite articles, while the is known as a definite article. That is because a and an refer to nonspecific things, while the refers to specific things. I have more guidance on how to use a and an on the website under the tab “English Rules” at Spelling, Vocabulary, and Confusing Words. Another good reference is the Purdue Online Writing Lab, “Using Articles.”

Leave a Reply