Anymore, Any more; Anyone, Any one; Everyone, Every one; Everybody, Every body

Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2020, at 11:00 pm

Some words written as one word will differ in meaning when split into two words. So you need to know which word you really want.

Anymore: any longer, nowadays
Example: Harry doesn’t travel anymore.

Any more: something additional or further
Example: I don’t want any more cake.

 

Anyone: anybody
Example: Anyone can learn to cook but few can learn to cook well.

Any one: any single member of a group of people or things
Example: Can any one of you tell me the answer to my question?

 

Everyone: everybody
Example: Everyone on the list has contributed to the ASPCA.

Every one: each one
Example: I wish I could buy every one of those puppies.

 

Everybody: everyone
Example: Everybody is working harder today than ten years ago.

Every body: each body
Example: Every body requires protein, vitamins, and minerals.

 

Pop Quiz

1. I don’t want to talk about this anymore/any more.

2. I didn’t ask for anymore/any more work to be put on my desk.

3. Not everyone/every one has natural rhythm.

4. However, everyone/every one of us can learn to dance.

5. She doesn’t know anyone/any one in France.

6. He likes everybody/every body that he works with.

7. Anyone/Any one of you can redecorate the office if you would like.

8. Everybody/Every body is made up of bones, muscles, and flesh.

 

Pop Quiz Answers

1. I don’t want to talk about this anymore.

2. I didn’t ask for any more work to be put on my desk.

3. Not everyone has natural rhythm.

4. However, every one of us can learn to dance.

5. She doesn’t know anyone in France.

6. He likes everybody that he works with.

7. Any one of you can redecorate the office if you would like.

8. Every body is made up of bones, muscles, and flesh

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