Category: Adjectives and Adverbs

Predicating Our Knowledge of Predicates

Posted on Tuesday, June 18, 2019, at 11:00 pm

A thorough review of English structure includes understanding subjects and predicates in broader terms. While the concepts of subjects and predicates in their totality may not be as commonly taught as they once were, a brief study will both reinforce our facility as writers and grammarians and further acquaint us with grammatical terminology. Today, we’ll focus on the predicate, the engine of the …

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Adjectives and Adverbs: Forms for Comparison

Posted on Tuesday, June 11, 2019, at 11:00 pm

A common error in using adjectives and adverbs arises from using the wrong form for comparison. Incorrect:  She is the poorest of the two women. Correct: She is poor. (positive form) She is the poorer of the two women. (comparative form/two items) She is the poorest of them all. (superlative form/more than two) Many one- …

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What’s Up With Up?

Posted on Tuesday, May 21, 2019, at 11:00 pm

We thought we would lighten things up a bit this week. We hope you enjoy it. There is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that word is up. It's easy to understand up, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, …

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Some vs. Any

Posted on Tuesday, April 9, 2019, at 11:00 pm

Any and some can be synonymous; that is, they may have the same meaning. Both may be used in affirmative or negative questions: Examples: Will you have any? Will you have some? Won't you have any? Won't you have some? Generally, it is better to use some, not any, for affirmative statements and answers. Correct: …

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Adjectives and Adverbs: Another Look at -ly

Posted on Tuesday, February 19, 2019, at 11:00 pm

Those who study English grammar will eventually review the adverbial ending -ly. GrammarBook last wrote about Adjectives and Adverbs: When to use -ly in October 2007; the post has remained on our website since then to offer guidance on using the suffix. More than eleven years later, however, we—and you too, perhaps—still often encounter misuse of the ending. For …

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