Category: Definitions

Effect vs. Affect

Posted on Wednesday, September 27, 2017, at 5:21 pm

Knowing whether to use effect or affect may not qualify you as a genius, but you will be demonstrating an understanding about a grammar issue most people find perplexing. We trust that the strategies offered here will clear up any confusion you have had. Rule: Use the verb effect when you mean "bring about" or "brought about," "cause" or "caused." Example: He effected a commotion in …

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How Are You—Good, Well, or Fine?

Posted on Wednesday, September 20, 2017, at 1:51 pm

We at GrammarBook strive to cover both current and established topics of relevance to you, our dedicated band of careful writers and grammarians. Periodically we still receive inquiries about when we should use the adjectives good, well, and fine. We, perhaps as you do, also still hear and read these words used incorrectly. We addressed the subject of Good vs. Well in …

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Striking the Surplus from Tautologies (Follow-Up 2)

Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2017, at 11:09 pm

In response to comments from our readers, last week we revisited our late April newsletter article on tautologies by re-examining vast majority. Today, we’ll conclude our review by looking more closely at two more terms: Contested Tautology #2: Identical Match This noun phrase presents a similar issue to that raised among readers for vast majority. The question lies in whether …

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Striking the Surplus from Tautologies (Follow-Up 1)

Posted on Tuesday, August 8, 2017, at 11:26 pm

A newsletter article in late April addressed the matter of the tautology (also known as a pleonasm), the “needless repetition of an idea, statement, or word.” We provided several such examples of overweight phrases and suggested how to trim them back into shape. Several readers responded in defense of certain phrases, sharing that what seemed to be a modifier repeating …

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Putting Out the Patrol for Made-Up Words

Posted on Tuesday, August 1, 2017, at 2:15 pm

Estimates of English’s total word count vary, but linguists agree the number ranks near the top of the world’s vocabularies. A May GrammarBook newsletter article cited English as having as many as 300,000 distinctly usable words. With so many residents in a vernacular, impostors posing as real words are bound to slip in. They start as mistakes …

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