Using Commas, Semicolons, and Colons Within Sentences



Two weeks ago we revisited the case of the lawsuit brought by a group of Maine dairy truck drivers that centered on the proper use of commas. Interestingly, the dispute was “resolved” through the use of semicolons (and cash). In light of that legal case, we thought it would be useful today to review the different functions served by these punctuation marks. The following article is one of Jane’s earliest weekly e-newsletter articles, first issued on October 1, 2006.

Punctuation within sentences can be tricky; however, if you know just a few of the following rules, you will be well on your way to becoming a polished writer and proofreader.

Rule: Use a comma between two long independent clauses when conjunctions such as and, or, but, for, nor connect them.
Example: I have painted the entire house, but she is still working on sanding the floors. 

Rule: If the clauses are both short, you may omit the comma.
Example: I painted and he sanded.

Rule: If you have only one clause (one subject and verb pair), you won’t usually need a comma in front of the conjunction.
Example: I have painted the house but still need to sand the floors.
This sentence has two verbs but only one subject, so it has only one clause.

Rule: Use the semicolon if you have two independent clauses connected without a conjunction.
Example: I have painted the house; I still need to sand the floors.

Rule: Also use the semicolon when you already have commas within a sentence for smaller separations, and you need the semicolon to show bigger separations.
Example: We had a reunion with family from Salt Lake City, Utah; Los Angeles, California; and Albany, New York. 

Rule: A colon is used to introduce a second sentence that clarifies the first sentence.
Example: We have set this restriction: do your homework before watching television. 
Notice that the first word of the second sentence is not capitalized. If, however, you have additional sentences following the sentence with the colon and they explain the sentence prior to the colon, capitalize the first word of all the sentences following the colon.

Rule: Use a colon to introduce a list when no introductory words like namely, for instance, i.e., e.g. precede the list.
Example: I need four paint colors: blue, gray, green, and red.

Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2018, at 8:30 pm

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4 Comments on Using Commas, Semicolons, and Colons Within Sentences

4 responses to “Using Commas, Semicolons, and Colons Within Sentences”

  1. Robin M. says:

    I have a question related to this one. Should this sentence have commas between a couple of the adjectives?
    Rule: Use a comma between two [comma?] long [comma?] independent clauses when conjunctions such as and, or, but, for, nor connect them.

  2. Fred B. says:

    It may be helpful to provide an example for your rule:
    If, however, you have additional sentences following the sentence with the colon and they explain the sentence prior to the colon, capitalize the first word of all the sentences following the colon.

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