Commas with Appositives

Posted on Sunday, September 2, 2007, at 7:11 pm

The definition of an appositive is a word or word group that defines or further identifies the noun or noun phrase preceding it. Rule: When an appositive is essential to the meaning of the noun it belongs to, don’t use commas. When the noun preceding the appositive provides sufficient identification on its own, use commas …

Read More

Dialogue Writing Tips

Posted on Monday, August 27, 2007, at 11:00 pm

The most common way to indicate a new speaker's dialogue is to start a new paragraph. Here is an example from my novel Touched: Rashan slouched into a nearby folding chair, not bothering to get one for Georgia. He moved a few braids from his forehead, but they fell back over his eyes. After a …

Read More

Colons with Lists

Posted on Saturday, August 11, 2007, at 8:09 pm

Rule 1: Use the colon after a complete sentence to introduce a list of items when introductory words such as namely, for example, or that is do not apply or are not appropriate. Examples: You may be required to bring many items: sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing. I want the following items: butter, sugar, …

Read More

Ellipsis Marks

Posted on Tuesday, July 17, 2007, at 2:21 am

Ellipsis marks (three dots) are used to show the omission of a word, phrase, line, or paragraph(s), from a quoted passage. The plural of this word is ellipses. The Three-dot Method There are many methods for using ellipses. The three-dot method is the simplest and is appropriate for most general works and many scholarly ones. …

Read More

Bad vs. Badly

Posted on Friday, July 6, 2007, at 2:50 pm

The word bad is an adjective used to modify nouns and pronouns. Example: She was in a bad accident. Adverbs often end in ly. The word badly is an adverb that answers how about the verb. Example: She was hurt badly in the accident. The confusion comes with four of the sense verbs: taste, look, smell, …

Read More

1 66 67 68 69 70 74